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Wednesday, June 13, 2018

Things to Consider When Picking an Executor

The role of an executor is to effectuate a deceased person’s wishes as declared in a will after he or she has passed on. The executor’s responsibilities include the distribution of assets according to the will, the maintenance of assets until the will is settled, and the paying of estate bills and debts. An old joke says that you should choose an enemy to perform the task because it is such a thankless job, even though the executor may take a percentage of the estate’s assets as a fee. The following issues should be considered when choosing an executor for one's estate.


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Sunday, June 3, 2018

What Your Loved Ones Absolutely Need to Know About Your Estate Plan

The conversation about a person’s last wishes can be an awkward one for both the individual who is the topic of conversation and his or her loved ones. The end of someone’s life is not a topic anyone looks forward to discussing. It is, however, an important conversation that must be had so that the family understands  the testator’s final wishes before he or she passes away. If a significant sum is being left to someone or some entity outside of the family, an explanation of this action may go a long way to avoiding a contested will. In a similar vein, if one heir is receiving a larger share of the estate than the others, it is prudent to have this action explained. If funds are being placed in a trust instead of given directly to the heirs, it makes sense for the testator to advise his or her loved ones in advance.


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Monday, May 28, 2018

What Does "Goodwill" Mean When Buying Business

Goodwill is an asset that is an intangible part of a business being purchased. In spite of its intangibility, goodwill may be worth more than concrete assets, such as property, buildings, machinery or inventory. Goodwill is the essence of the company's value to its customers, clients, and employees and, as such, is invaluable to any buyer. It is easier, as many people intending to purchase a business will tell you, to maintain goodwill than to establish it, since, among other things, goodwill takes time to build. Purchasing a business that already has established goodwill in the community can give the new owner a strong competitive edge. 


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Monday, May 14, 2018

What is an Estate Tax?

While the terms "estate tax" and "inheritance tax" are often used interchangeably, they are not synonymous. Let's try to clarify the difference.


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Sunday, May 6, 2018

Copyright Protection and Fair Use

Authors often want to understand the eligibility of their writings for copyright protection. Legal copyright registration provides the copyright holder with a collection of special rights. Under the U.S. Copyright Act, a rightful owner maintains the “exclusive right to reproduce, distribute, perform, display, license, and . . . prepare derivative works” founded on his or her creations.  However, these “exclusive” rights are curtailed by the “fair use” doctrine, which typically allows others to use your work legally for certain limited purposes, such as “criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, or research.” 


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Friday, April 27, 2018

Costs Associated with Dying Without a Will

When someone dies without a will, it is known as dying intestate.  In such cases, state law (of the state in which the person resides) governs how the person's estate is administered. In most states, the individual's assets are split -- with one third of the estate going to the spouse and all surviving children splitting the rest. For people who leave behind large estates, unless they have established trusts or other tax avoidance protections, there may be a tremendous tax liability, including both estate and inheritance tax.


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Friday, April 13, 2018

How a Prenuptial Agreement Can Protect Your Estate

There are many circumstances that can impact an estate plan, not the least of which is divorce. While ending a marriage is complicated, it is not only crucial to arrive at a fair and equitable distribution of the marital assets, but to preserve your estate as well.


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Monday, April 2, 2018

The Difference Between Equal and Equitable Inheritances

When it comes to estate planning, many individuals believe that dividing assets equally among adult children is the best choice. However, there are situations in which leaving each child the same amount might not be practical. For this reason, it is important to know the difference between an equal inheritance and an equitable inheritance, in which each child receives a fair share based on his or her circumstances.

What is an equal inheritance?

In this situation, each child gets the same amount of the remaining estate after both parents have died.

This option works well when the needs of each child are the same, or the parents provided similar support to each child in the past. Moreover, each child must be mentally or emotionally capable and financially responsible.

It is important to note that cases in which an estate includes real property and other tangible assets, it may be necessary to determine the differences in value of these assets in order to leave each child an appropriate amount. Lastly, leaving an equal inheritance may be the best way to avoid the emotional and financial costs of disputes.

What is an equitable inheritance?

In some cases, leaving each child and equal inheritance may not be the right thing to do. For example, it may be wise to reward a child who has taken on the role of caregiver for an aging parent or to compensate him or her for lost time and wages. There are also circumstances in which children may have been given different amounts of money while the parents were alive either for a wedding, educational expenses or a down payment on a home.

Lastly, for those who have a disabled child who receives public benefits, it may be necessary to provide for living expenses and medical needs in a special needs trust. In all of these situations, an equitable distribution of the estate assets is the best option.

The Bottom Line

In the end, determinations about the distribution of an estate to surviving children should be made in a way that will preserve family harmony. For this reason, it is important to discuss your decisions with your children and engage the services of an experienced estate planning attorney.




Monday, March 26, 2018

Caution: Sexual Harassment in the Workplace

Given the many high profile cases in the media, it is crucial for any business to understand its responsibility to prevent sexual harassment in the workplace. Generally, sexual harassment is deemed to be a form of sex discrimination under Title VII of the Civil Rights of 1964 (Title VII), and most states have far stricter laws in place designed to prevent harassment.

 There are two types of sexual harassment: quid pro quo ("this for that") and hostile work environment.

  •  Quid pro quo - This occurs when an employer, most often a person in a position of authority, demands sexual favors in exchange for a job or any other benefit of employment including promotions, bonuses and raises. An employee who is fired, disciplined, or given a poor performance evaluation, for refusing a sexual advance may be the victim of this form of harassment.
  • Hostile work environment - This involves an employee being subjected to a pattern of unwelcome conduct, such as comments or visual displays, that is severe or pervasive enough to create a distressing work environment and alter the conditions of employment.

In order to have grounds for a claim, the employee must demonstrate that he or she believed the conduct was offensive or hostile. It is also necessary to show that a reasonable person in the same position would believe the conduct was hostile. Finally, the employee must prove that he or she complained to a supervisor and that the employer failed to take action to stop the harassment.

Before filing a lawsuit, the employee must file a complaint with the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. If the matter is not resolved, a civil lawsuit can then be filed.

In short, all employees have a right to a workplace that is free from sexual harassment. It is crucial for any business to establish policies to prevent such conduct, and institute procedures to address any employee concerns. Ultimately sexual harassment is bad for business because it can create a toxic work environment that adversely impacts employee morale. Moreover, a lawsuit can not only lead to a costly settlement, but also damage a company's reputation.


Monday, March 19, 2018

A Primer on Advance Medical Directives

While the main objective of estate planning is to help individuals protect their assets and provide for  loved ones, there are other important considerations, such as planning for incapacity. In short, it is crucial  to plan for the type of medical care people wish to receive if a serious accident or illness makes them unable to make or communicate these decisions. By putting in place advance medical directives, such as a durable power of attorney for healthcare and a living will, it is possible to plan for these unexpected events.

Durable Power of Attorney for Healthcare

A durable power of attorney for healthcare is commonly referred to as a healthcare proxy. This estate planning tool enables individuals to designate a trusted family member or friend to make medical care decisions in the event of incapacity. This person essentially acts as an agent, and is responsible for working with doctors and other medical professionals to ensure they provide the type of medical care the incapacitated individual prefers. If a healthcare proxy is not in place, it will be necessary for loved ones to ask the court to appoint someone make these decisions. In the end, this advance medical directive protects individuals in the event of an emergency and relieves others of the burden of going to court.

Living Will

A living will is another important advance medical directive that clarifies the type of medical care an individual prefers to receive if he or she becomes terminally ill and cannot communicate decisions about end of life treatment. In particular, a living will establishes whether certain measures, such as a ventilator or a feeding tube, should be used to prolong the individual's life

Other Essential Healthcare Directives

In situations when an individual becomes critically ill and does not wish to receive extraordinary life prolonging measures, it is necessary to complete a do not resuscitate order (DNR). In the event of a medical emergency, a DNR notifies doctors, nurses and emergency personnel not to use cardiopulmonary resuscitation to keep an individual alive.

Lastly, it is also important to ensure that other healthcare providers and organizations can access an individual's medical records and history. For this reason, it is necessary to complete a HIPAA authorization - a document required by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

In the end, the possibility of becoming ill and not being able to communicate is not something most of us want to think about. However, putting in place these important advance medical directives can give you and your loved ones peace of mind knowing that your wishes will be carried out.


Monday, March 5, 2018

Use of Non-Disclosure Agreements

 

As a small business owner, it is essential to protect sensitive information that is often referred to as trade secrets. While some well known examples of trade secrets include the formula for Coca-Cola and Google's algorithms, any business information such as practices and techniques, processes and procedures, needs to remain confidential. In some cases, business data such as client and vendor lists may qualify as a trade secret.

Although trade secrets and other confidential business information are protected by state and federal laws, it is crucial to secure this information through the use of a confidentiality or non-disclosure agreement. In sum, this is a legal contract between two or more parties in which the party receiving the sensitive information agrees not to reveal it to any other party without prior permission or authorization.

In situations in which a business engages with vendors or enters into a strategic alliance with a similar business, a separate, stand-alone agreement can be used. Similarly, confidentiality provisions can be incorporated into an employment agreement for employees who are given access to sensitive business information. In either case, common provisions included in these agreements include:

  • A definition of the confidential information (but usually not the protected information itself)

  • An explanation as to why the information is being provided to the receiving party

  • Terms under which the information may be disclosed to appropriate parties (such as on a need-to-know basis)

  • The circumstances in which the information may or not be used

  • The duration of time  the information must be kept confidential

In order for a non-disclosure agreement to be enforceable, it must be deemed fair. A court typically looks to whether an agreement is overly restrictive in making a determination of fairness. If the contract is unduly burdensome to the party receiving the information, a court may find all or part of the agreement invalid. If the information has already been revealed to a third party and the agreement is deemed to be invalid, a business may be barred from recovering damages for its losses. For this reason, it is crucial to consult with an experienced business law attorney who can help to prepare a well designed non-disclosure or confidentiality agreement.

 


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