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Monday, February 19, 2018

Things to Consider Establishing a Charitable Giving Plan


For many individuals, leaving a legacy of charity is an important component of estate planning, but there are many factors involved in creating a charitable giving plan.

First, it is important to select causes that you believe in such as environmental, educational, religious or medical, or those dedicated to providing food and shelter to the poor. The number of charities you wish to give to depends on your available resources, as well as other beneficiaries of your estate. Many people opt to limit their selections to a handful of charities that are most important to them.

Once charities have been selected, it is crucial to do some homework to make sure the charities are legitimate, and that your gift will be used for the intended purpose, rather than to pay salaries or administrative costs.
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Monday, February 12, 2018

An Overview of Foundational Corporate Documents

There are a number of steps involved in forming a corporation from selecting a name, obtaining the necessary licenses and permits, paying certain fees, and filing foundational documents with the appropriate state agency. While an attorney can help prepare and file the required papers, the owners, officer and directors should have a basic understanding of these documents.

Articles of Incorporation

The first underlying document is the Articles of Incorporation which states the corporate name, and the  purpose of the business. This is typically a generic statement to the effect that the corporation will conduct any lawful business in the state in accordance with its objectives.  In addition, the type and amount of stock that will be issued (common or preferred) must be established. This document should contain any other pertinent information, including the name and address of a registered agent.

Corporate By-laws

By-laws are the formal rules regarding the day-today operations of a corporation. This document outlines the corporate structure and establishes the rights and powers of the shareholders, officers and directors. By-laws specify how officers and directors are nominated and elected as well as their responsibilities. In addition this document should clarify how disputes among the parties will be resolved. By-laws establish where and when meetings will be held, whether quarterly, annually or at other times, what constitutes a quorum, as well as voting and proxy rules. Lastly, this document should also contain information on the issuance of shares of stock and other operational details.

Meeting Minutes

After the corporate existence has begun, an initial organizational meeting of the principals must be held in order to adopt by-laws, elect directors, issue stock, and to conduct any other business. All of these activities must be memorialized in meeting minutes, which must also be prepared during any subsequent meetings.

Stock Certificates

Stock certificates are the record of any stock that was initially issued.

Once these foundational documents are in place, a corporation is also required to keep complete and accurate books and records of account and must maintain a record containing the names and addresses of all shareholders. All of these documents may fall under different names and the applicable laws vary from state to state. Because this is a complicated process and one that requires careful analysis, you are well advised to engage the services of an experienced business law attorney to help prepare and file the necessary foundational documents.


Tuesday, January 30, 2018

What are Letters Testamentary?

An individual who has been named as a personal representative or executor in a will has a number of important duties. These include gathering the deceased person's property and transferring it to the beneficiaries through a court-supervised process known as probate. In order to initiate this proceeding, the executor must first obtain what are referred to as letters testamentary. This document gives the executor the legal authority to administer the deceased person's estate.

While the process varies from state to state, the executor must petition the probate court in the county in which the decedent lived. This typically requires submitting the death certificate and completing a short application. The application includes a sworn statement that the person has been named as the executor in the will, as well as an estimate of the estate's property and debts.

The probate court will then hold a hearing to verify that the individual meets the qualifications to act as executor. Generally he or she must be a mentally competent adult and not be a convicted felon. If approved, the court will issue letters testamentary and officially open probate.

In short, the letters allow the executor to collect the assets of the deceased which may be held by  another person or an institution such as a bank. Since banks and other institutions may want to keep the document on file, it is necessary to obtain multiple certified copies. The executor can also carry out his or her other duties such as inventorying and appraising assets, paying debts, and transferring property to beneficiaries, according to the terms of the will.

Letters of Administration

In the event a person dies without a valid will in place, an heir of the decedent, typically a legal relative, needs to petition the probate court for letters of administration. In this situation, the court will hold a hearing to appoint this individual to act as the estate administrator, issue the letters and open probate. The administrator then manages and distributes the assets according to the state's intestacy laws which generally give priority to spouses, children and parents.


Monday, January 29, 2018

Common Lawsuits brought against Small Businesses

It is impossible to predict every lawsuit that a small business might possibly face. There is nothing to prevent angry vendors, entitled customers, or disgruntled employees from filing a lawsuit, even if there is no legitimate basis for it. The more a business owner delegates responsibilities to employees, the greater the risk that an employee makes a mistake and exposes the business to a lawsuit. Even the most vigilant, hands on business owner is bound to make a mistake that can lead to a complaint filed against the business.

The most common lawsuits brought against businesses are wrongful termination suits brought by employees or candidates who have suffered a negative employment action. This can be anything from being fired to being demoted or even passed over for an advancement opportunity. If the employee or candidate believes that the action was taken for a reason related to race, gender, religion, identity, or another protected classification, that employee might file a lawsuit. For this reason, it is important to document any sort of negative or positive behaviors at work, so that if an employee does complain of discrimination, the courts can see the employee’s work history and the real reason why he or she may have been passed over for a promotion. Disparaging remarks made about any of these protected classes have no business in a work place as they can create a hostile work environment and lead to lawsuits as well.

Many employers choose to save money by denying their employees overtime pay. This can create many extra costs, as employees will sue for the money they are owed, and the legal fees can be significant. It is a good idea to have contracts establishing the boundaries of a relationship between an employer and an employee to minimize confusion.

It also makes sense to put agreements with vendors and customers in writing. The contracts should include a general description of the work to be performed, a list of any items to be delivered, a project schedule with deadlines, the fee, and the circumstances under which additional fees might be charged, warranties included with the work, how long the contract lasts, how it can be terminated, and how disputes will be resolved.

Personal injury lawsuits against businesses are also common, so it is important to make sure that a place of business is kept in safe condition. Floors should always be dry and warnings should be presented to customers of any dangerous conditions. Drivers should be selected carefully as any accident they cause can be made the responsibility of the business that employs them. Employees who are injured at work are usually precluded from suing their employer and are instead referred to worker’s compensation courts which have their own legal fees. Most states require employers to carry insurance in case of a workplace injury.


Monday, January 15, 2018

The Benefits of Incorporating in Safe Haven States

Many business owners believe it's best to incorporate in their home state, but there are often business and tax advantages available in other states. In particular, Delaware and Nevada are attractive to those who are looking to form a corporation. These so-called corporate haven states are considered to be business friendly.

The State of Delaware is well regarded for its supportive business and corporate laws, said to be among the most favorable in the United States. In addition, the state has a judicial body, the Court of Chancery, that is dedicated to business matters. This exclusive focus allows the court to hear cases quickly and efficiently.

Delaware also features a government agency that is focused on supporting businesses, the Division of Corporations. In particular, this agency has streamlined procedures for incorporating that allow businesses to hit the ground running. The Division boasts long hours and provides new businesses with easy access to important resources.

Lastly, the tax law in Delaware is amenable to corporations. A corporation that is formed, but does not conduct business, in the state is not liable for corporate income tax. Moreover, there is no personal income tax for those domiciled in the state or for shareholders that do not reside in Delaware.

Nevada is the second most popular state in which to incorporate. The state's business law affords favorable treatment to corporations. In particular, owners and managers of a corporation are rarely held responsible for the actions of the corporation in the state. Nevada also offers advantageous tax treatment to corporations with no personal income, franchise or corporate income tax.

Depending upon the exigencies of your business,  incorporating in Delaware or Nevada might be the best alternative. By engaging the services of an experienced business and tax law attorney, you can take advantage of these corporate safe havens.

 


Monday, January 8, 2018

What is Settlement Planning?

Settlement planning is a unique and expanding area of law that is designed to help individuals preserve benefits that have been received from a personal injury settlement, inheritance or judgment. The practice encompasses an array of legal services such as special needs planning, estate planning and financial planning. The objective is to assist clients with resolving claims and to create a structure to properly manage the funds.

Settlement planning is particularly designed for minors, individuals with disabilities, adults who lack capacity and individuals who are receiving public benefits. Without careful planning, those who receive a large settlement or other proceeds may have difficulty managing these funds. In addition, individuals who receive benefits may lose their eligibility for vital government aid.  

This area of law relies on a multi-disciplinary approach that requires the collaboration of a qualified network of professionals including personal injury attorneys, financial planners, CPAs, and trust and estates attorneys. Their combined efforts are geared toward helping clients maintain their quality of life and plan their financial future.

Accomplishing these objectives often requires establishing a variety of complex planning mechanisms such as special needs trusts, structured settlement annuities, and guardianships. In so doing, there are a number of related considerations, including:

  • Identification of Public Assistance Programs

  • Medicare and Medicaid Lien Resolution

  • Medicare Set Aside Arrangements

  • Structured Settlement Planning

  • Identifying Qualified Fiduciaries

  • Trust Administration Support

Because each case is unique, it is crucial to tailor a settlement plan to the client's circumstances. Nonetheless, a typical plan addresses matters such as financial needs and planning, estate planning concerns, tax planning, or establishing guardianships for minors. Lastly, this area of law also requires proving ongoing comprehensive legal services to trustees to assist them with meeting their fiduciary obligations.

In short, settlement planning dovetails with estate planning for purposes of providing for a client's lifetime needs, establishing and achieving financial goals, and if necessary, maintaining eligibility for public benefits. In the end, individuals who are scheduled to receive a settlement, inheritance or judgment should engage the services of an attorney with experience in settlement planning.


Monday, July 24, 2017

Why New Parents Need an Estate Plan

Becoming a new parent is a life changing experience, and caring for a child is an awesome responsibility as well as a joy. This is also the time to think about your child's future by asking an important question: who will care for your child if you become disabled or die? The best way to put your mind at ease is by having an estate plan.

The most basic estate planning tool is a will, which enables a person to determine how his or her assets will be distributed after death. Without this important estate planning tool, the state's intestacy laws will govern how these assets will be distributed. In addition, decisions about who will care for any minor children will be made by the court. For this reason, it is crucial for new parents to have a will as this is the only way to name guardians for minor children.

In this regard, selecting guardians involves a number of important considerations. Obviously, it is important to name individuals who are emotionally and financially capable of raising a child. At the same time, a will can also establish a trust that provides funds to be used to provide for the child's needs. Ultimately, guardians should share the same moral and spiritual values, and childrearing philosophy of the parents.

In addition to naming guardians in a will, it is also critical to plan for the possibility of incapacity by creating powers of attorney and advance medical directives. A durable power of attorney allows a new parent to name a spouse, or other trusted relative or friend, to handle personal and financial affairs. Further, a power of attorney for healthcare, or healthcare proxy, designates a trusted person to make medical decisions in accordance with the parent's preferences.

Finally, new parents should also obtain adequate life insurance to protect the family. The proceeds from an insurance policy can replace lost income, pay household and living expenses, as well as any debts that may have been owed by the deceased parent. It is also important to ensure that beneficiary designations on any retirement accounts are up to date so that these assets can be transferred expediently.

In the end, having a child is a time of joy, but also one that requires careful planning. The best way to protect your family is by consulting with an experienced estate planning attorney who can help you navigate the process.

 


Monday, July 17, 2017

Employment Discrimination Laws in a Nutshell

There are a variety of state and federal laws that make it illegal for employers to discriminate based on certain characteristics when making decisions about hiring, terminating, promoting, demoting or compensating employees, or any other terms and conditions of employment. Employers are also barred from retaliating against employees who file a discrimination-related complaint or engage in other protected activities. While the laws vary from state to state, all employers have an obligation to adhere to the following federal laws.

Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

This law prohibits discrimination in the workplace based on race, color, national origin, religion and gender. Title VII also established the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), the government agency that is tasked with investigating employment discrimination claims.  Before an employment discrimination lawsuit under federal law can be brought, it is necessary to file a claim with the EEOC. Title VII applies to employers with 15 or more employees.

Age Discrimination in Employment Act (ADEA)

The ADEA prohibits employers with 20 or more employees from discriminating against individuals who are 40 years or older and their age cannot be used as a factor in any employment decision.

The American with Disabilities Act (ADA)

The ADA prohibits employers with 15 or more employees from discriminating or harassing disabled employees and requires employers to make reasonable accommodations that will enable a qualified disabled worker to complete his or her job functions.  

The Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA)

The PDA prohibits discrimination based on pregnancy regarding any aspect of employment in businesses with 15 or more employees. Women who are temporarily unable to perform their jobs due to pregnancy must be treated similarly to other temporarily disabled workers. The ADA may also protect a woman who suffers from a pregnancy related medical condition.

The Bottom Line

In sum, employers are prohibited from discriminating against employees and potential job candidates because of race, religion, sex, age, disability, pregnancy or national origin. Not only can violations lead to financial penalties, a discrimination lawsuit can damage a business' reputation. By engaging the services of an experienced employment law attorney, you can establish policies and procedures to ensure that your business is in compliance with these laws.

 


Monday, July 10, 2017

A Primer on Irrevocable Trusts

Many individuals are aware that a will is one way to plan for the distribution of their assets after death. However, a comprehensive estate plan also considers other objectives such as planning for long-term care and asset protection. For this reason, it is essential to consider utilizing an irrevocable trust.

This estate planning tool becomes effective during a person's lifetime, but it cannot be amended or modified. The person making the trust, the grantor, transfers property into the trust permanently. In so doing, the grantor no longer owns property, and a designated trustee owns and manages the assets for the benefit of the beneficiaries.

In short, irrevocable trust provide a number of advantages. First, the property is not subject to estate taxes because the grantor no longer owns it. Moreover, unlike a will, an irrevocable trust is not probated in court. Finally, assets are protected from creditors.

Common Irrevocable Trusts

There are a variety of irrevocable trusts, including:

  • Bypass Trusts -  utilized by married couples to reduce estate taxes when the second spouse dies. In this arrangement, the property of the spouse who dies first is transferred into the trust for the benefit of the surviving spouse. Because he or she does not own it, the property does not become part of this spouse's estate when he or she dies.

  • Charitable Trusts - created to reduce income and estate taxes through a combination of gifting and charitable donations.  For example, charitable remainder trust transfers property into a trust and names a charity as the final beneficiary, but another individual receives income before,  for a certain time period.

  • Life Insurance Trusts - proceeds of life insurance are removed from the estate and ownership of the policy is transferred into the trust. While insurance passes outside of the estate, it is factored into the value of the estate for tax purposes, so this vehicle is designed to minimize estate taxes.

  • Spendthrift Trusts – designed to protect those who may not be able to manage finances on their own. A trustee is named to manage and distribute the funds to the beneficiary or directly to creditors, depending on the terms of the trust.

  • Special needs trusts - designed to protect the public benefits that many special needs individuals receive. Since an inheritance could disqualify a beneficiary from Medicaid, for example, this estate planning tool provides money for additional day to day expenses while preserving the government benefits.

The Takeaway

Irrevocable trusts are essential estate planning tools that can protect an individual's assets, minimize taxes and provide for loved ones. In the end, these objectives can be accomplished with the advice and counsel of an experienced estate planning attorney.

 


Monday, June 26, 2017

Responsibilities and Obligations of the Executor/ Administrator

When a person dies with a will in place, an executor is named as the responsible individual for winding down the decedent's affairs. In situations in which a will has not been prepared, the probate court will appoint an administrator. Whether you have been named  as an executor or administrator, the role comes with certain responsibilities including taking charge of the decedent's assets, notifying beneficiaries and creditors, paying the estate's debts and distributing the property to the beneficiaries.

In some cases, an executor may also be a beneficiary of the will, however he or she must act fairly and in accordance with the provisions of the will. An executor is specifically responsible for:

  • Finding a copy of the will and filing it with the appropriate state court

  • Informing third parties, such as banks and other account holders, of the person’s death

  • Locating assets and identifying debts

  • Providing the court with an inventory of these assets and debts

  • Maintaining any assets until they are disposed of

  • Disposing of assets either through distribution or sale

  • Satisfying any debts

  • Appearing in court on behalf of the estate

Depending on the size of the estate and the way in which the decedent's assets were titled, the will may need to be probated. If the estate must go through s probate proceeding, the executor must file with the court to probate the will and be appointed as the estate's legal representative.

By doing so, the executor can then pay all of the decedent's outstanding debts and distribute the property to the beneficiaries according to the terms of the will. The executor is also is also responsible for filing all federal and state tax returns for the deceased person as well as estate taxes, if any. Lastly, an executor may be entitled to compensation for the time he or she served the estate. If the court names an administrator, this individual will have similar responsibilities.

In the end, being name an executor or appointed as an administrator ultimately means supporting the overall goal of distributing the estate assets according to wishes of the deceased or state law. In either case, an experienced probate or estate planning attorney can help you carry out these duties.


Monday, June 19, 2017

Employment Contracts in a Nutshell

The contemporary workplace has become increasingly complicated as many businesses are governed by a wide range of state and federal employment laws. Moreover, the relationship between employers and employees has also become more complex, particularly as the work force becomes more diverse. For this reason, business owners should consider utilizing employment contracts to clarify these associations.

While such agreements may not be necessary across the board, they are well suited for executives, sales people, or those who have either a decision making role or an ownership interest in the business. As such, the first element of a comprehensive employment contract is a description of the employee's duties and the duration of employment.

Obviously, an employment contract should specify the salary that is being paid as well as any work-related benefits: bonuses, vacation pay, health insurance, expense accounts, stock options and retirement plans. The contract should also clarify whether the employee is working at will and the grounds for termination. It is important to note that an employee who is fired for reasons not stated in the agreement may have grounds for a wrongful termination lawsuit.

Depending on the nature of the business, it is also necessary to protect sensitive information with confidentiality provisions. In particular, it is crucial to protect trade secrets, such as formulas, designs, practices, client lists or any other information that is generally not known to the public. Moreover, employees should be notified that all work product is owned by the business. Similarly, if the entity has relationships with independent contractors or freelancers, it is important to clarify that anything they produce is on a work-for-hire basis.

In addition to confidentiality provisions, it may also be necessary to include a non-compete clause clarifying that an employee will not accept a similar job with a competitor in the geographical region for a specified period of time.

In the end, there are a number of benefits to utilizing employment contracts. In addition to helping to retain key employees and minimize the costs of training new people, employment contracts give a business control over performance standards. Further, these agreements provide protection against the potential misappropriation of trade secrets and other intellectual property. Ultimately, these agreements help to clarify the rights and obligations of both the employer and the employee. By engaging the services of an experienced employment law attorney, a business can put in place a well designed employment agreement.


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