Share

Gianelli & Associates News Blog

Monday, August 15, 2016

What is a 501(c)(3)?

A 501(c)(3) nonprofit is one of a class of 29 different types of tax-exempt, nonprofit organizations under section 501(c) of the tax code. Most charitable organizations that receive donations from individuals in the United States are organized as 501(c)(3) nonprofits. The 501(c)(3) status is the most coveted type of nonprofit status because donations to these organizations can be deducted from income for tax purposes by the donors. This makes fundraising significantly easier.

501(c)(3) tax exemptions are reserved for businesses that operate for religious, scientific, literary, charitable, or educational purposes. They are also permitted when the organization provides services to test products for public safety, aims to prevent cruelty against children and animals, or fosters national or international amateur sporting competitions. A group trying to convince an American city to host the Olympics can be a 501(c)(3) even if it is not a charity in the traditional sense. In order to qualify as a religious organization, a church must comply with the rules outlined in IRS publication 1828 or risk losing its tax exempt status. All 501(c)(3) organizations are prohibited from engaging in supporting political candidates, and there are hard limits to the amount of lobbying a charitable organization may make to influence legislation.

To qualify as a 501(c)(3), an organization must include in its articles of incorporation or bylaws restrictions on its power to operate for profit. Without this restriction, the organization’s tax exempt status will be denied, both by the Internal Revenue Service and by the state government. A 501(c)(3) company must receive a substantial portion of its funding by soliciting donations from the general public or government grants. If the organization raises most of its money by selling products or providing services, it cannot operate as a 501(c)(3), even if all the money raised is used for charitable purposes, though for small fundraisers, like carwashes or bake sales, exceptions may be permitted. An organization that receives significant income from private donations and government grants is called a public charity. Another type of 501(c)(3) is a private foundation, which is also tax exempt, and which may also receive tax-deductible donations. Private foundations, however, earn the bulk of their money through investments and endowments. This money is then donated to other charitable organizations.


Archived Posts

2017
2016
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2015
December
November
October
September
August
July
June
May
April
March
February
January
2014


Based in Modesto, CA Gianelli & Associates, PLC serves clients throughout California.



© 2017 Gianelli & Associates, PLC | Disclaimer
1014 16th Street, Modesto, CA 95354
| Phone: 209.521.6260

Estate Planning | Civil Litigation | Business Law | Real Estate Law | Family Law | | Attorneys | About Us | 2nd to Die

Law Firm Website Design by
Amicus Creative