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Gianelli & Associates News Blog

Monday, October 12, 2015

Questions You Shouldn't Ask or Answer During an Interview

Job-seekers have to be ready to respond to any interview question asked of them, but not every question has to be answered. 

To ensure that employers do not discriminate against candidates based on age, gender, race, health and family arrangements, there are certain regulations which restrict the type of questions which are permissible during an interview. Below, we explore several topics that may be problematic and should not be asked of potential employees: 

Questionable Questions

Let’s take a look at a few topics that may be problematic. 

  • Age: Does anyone like to be asked their age unless just turning 21? Probably not. While an interviewer may ask whether a candidate is over the age of 18 or 21, he or she may not ask for a specific age.  
  • Nationality: An interviewer can ask whether a candidate is legally allowed to work in the U.S., but he or she can’t ask about the applicant’s nationality or status as a citizen. 
  • Religious beliefs: Same goes for questions that ask about religious beliefs. The interviewer may be in the right if he or she needs to know if the interviewee can work on certain holidays, but otherwise, this topic should be off limits.
  • Health: While in many states an interviewer cannot ask if a candidate smokes, he or she may inquire as to whether the applicant has ever violated any corporate policies on alcohol or tobacco. Furthermore, an employer may ask whether the person being interviewed uses illegal drugs, is able to lift a given weight, or can reach items at a specific height. They also can ask if the individual is capable of completing certain tasks associated with the job and if any reasonable accommodations might be needed.
  • Family status: Employers want to know about an applicant’s availability which may sound like a legitimate concern.   They cross the red line, however, when they try to determine if a candidate has children or plans to have children in the future. An interviewer also cannot ask about an applicant’s maiden name or marital status.
  • Criminal record: A prospective employer is allowed to ask the applicant whether or not he or she has ever been convicted of a crime that relates to the job, but may be restricted from asking whether the candidate has ever been arrested.
  • Military service: An interviewer cannot discriminate against a member of the National Guard or Reserves. He or she can, however, ask if a candidate will anticipate any extended time away from work. 

Acing the Interview Process

The interview process can be a stressful time for employers and employees alike, but it will be a smoother process if you have a basic understanding of what can and can’t be asked during these initial meetings. 

As a candidate being interviewed, remember that if you’re asked a question which you’re not comfortable answering, or you think may be illegal, be sure to keep a positive attitude and try not to focus on the negative and instead deliver an answer which showcases your ability to fulfill the requirements of the job. For example, you may be asked if you can have a babysitter in a moment’s notice if an unexpected work emergency pops up. In answering this question, you may be concerned that you will be divulging too much information about your family life and, like many mothers, you may fear that they may not hire you because of the responsibilities that come along with motherhood. Rather than answering the specific question about a babysitter, you may instead wish to say “I am very flexible and am able to travel or work late when the need arises.” This answer addresses the interviewer’s question while preserving your privacy and also keeps the conversation going in a positive direction-one which showcases why you are the best candidate for the job. 

As an employer looking to hire a new employee, it’s important that everyone in your organization from the receptionist to the hiring manager who might come in contact with the candidates have a basic understanding of what topics and questions are off limits. You might even consider having a list of approved questions and a list of questions which are prohibited, regardless of the position being filled. These procedures should be a matter of strict company policy and should be reviewed each year to ensure compliance with all discrimination laws. 


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